Virtuous cycles and complexity in the workplace

Conventional top-down project planning and decision making approaches, in combination with systems and structures that enforce conventional hierarchical relationships work pretty well in the absence of volatility, uncertainty, and change. But the same structures that enforce order and help mitigate risk under relatively stable conditions also reduce adaptivity, which means that in our current highly complex and volatile marketplace, many conventionally structured organizations are struggling to adapt.

Several specific needs have been identified, including:

  1. Employees who embrace change and lifelong learning (especially with respect to their capacity to work with increasing complexity),
  2. Organizational cultures characterized by continuous learning & development, innovation, engagement, and collaboration within and across teams,
  3. Decision-making processes, planning processes, people development processes, and governance structures that actively support 1 & 2.

Most change processes address 1 and 2, but there has been less attention to 3. Until recently.

VCoLMany of the change processes that address number 3 involve the creative use of intentional virtuous cycles—like the one that’s at the core of our learning model (VCoL+7). Virtuous cycles like VCoL, scrum, dynamic steering, and design thinking are now being implemented in large organizations to increase agility, innovation, collaboration, learning, and engagement. And when it comes to managing complexity, they may well be the most effective tools available.

Map of Google's organizational structureAs an example, Google, which works with agile & scrum as well as other virtuous cycles, is well known for it’s culture of collaboration, continuous learning, and innovation. And its organizational structure, which eliminates silos and is sustained by cross-team collaboration, is part of what keeps that culture alive.

VCoL, like other virtuous cycles, can be embedded in organizational systems to help foster a learning culture. The classic, The fifth discipline: The art & practice of the learning organization (Peter Senge), and the more accessible, An everyone culture: Becoming a deliberately developmental organization (Robert Kegan, Lisa Laskow Lahey) describe two approaches that involve VCoLs. Lectical Assessments are designed to support approaches like these—improving performance by fostering optimal learning and development, and supporting dynamic steering by measuring program effectiveness.

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