This is a terrible way to learn

Honestly folks, we really, really, really need to get over the memorization model of learning. It’s good for spelling bees, trivia games, Jeopardy, and passing multiple choice tests. But it’s BORING if not torturous! And cramming more and more facts into our brains isn’t going to help most of us thrive in real life — especially in the 21st century.

As an employer, I don’t care how many facts are in your head or how quickly you can memorize new information. I’m looking for talent, applied expertise (not just factual or theoretical knowledge), and the following skills and attributes:

The ability to tell the difference between memorizing and understanding

I won’t delegate responsibility to employees who can’t tell the difference between memorizing and understanding. Employees who can’t make this distinction don’t know when they need to ask questions. Consequently, they repeatedly make decisions that aren’t adequately informed.

I’ve taken to asking potential employees what it feels like when they realize they’ve really understood something. Many applicants, including highly educated applicants, don’t understand the question. It’s not their fault. The problem is an educational system that’s way too focused on memorizing.

The ability to think

It’s essential that every employee in my organization is able to evaluate information, solve problems, participate actively in decision making and know the difference between an opinion and a good evidence-based argument.

A desire to listen and the skills for doing it well

We also need employees who want and know how to listen — really listen. In my organization, we don’t make decisions in a vacuum. We seek and incorporate a wide range of stakeholder perspectives. A listening disposition and listening skills are indispensable.

The ability to speak truth (constructively)

I know my organization can’t grow the way I want it to if the people around me are unwilling to share their perspectives or are unable to share them constructively. When I ask someone for an opinion, I want to hear their truth — not what they think I want to hear.

The ability to work effectively with others

This requires respect for other human beings, good interpersonal, collaborative, and conflict resolution skills, the ability to hear and respond positively to productive critique, and buckets of compassion.

Humility

Awareness of the ubiquity of human fallibility, including one’s own, and knowledge about human limitations, including the built-in mental biases that so often lead us astray.

A passion for learning (a.k.a. growth mindset)

I love working with people who are driven to increase their understanding and skills — so driven that they’re willing to feel lost at times, so driven that they’re willing to make mistakes on their way to a solution, so driven that their happiness depends on the availability of new challenges.

The desire to do good in the world

I run a nonprofit. We need employees who are motivated to do good.

Not one of these capabilities can be learned by memorizing. All of them are best learned through reflective practice — preferably 12–16 years of reflective practice (a.k.a VCoLing) in an educational system that is not obsessed with remembering.

In case you’re thinking that maybe I’m a oddball employer, check out LinkedIn’s 2018 Workplace Learning Report, and the 2016 World Economic Forum Future of Jobs Report.

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World Economic Forum—tomorrow’s skills

The top 10 workplace skills of the future.

Sources: Future of Jobs Report, WEF 2017

In a recent blog post—actually in several recent blog posts—I've been emphasizing the importance of building tomorrow's skills. These are the kinds of skills we all need to navigate our increasingly complex and changing world. While I may not agree that all of the top 10 skills listed in the World Economic Forum report (shown above) belong in a list of skills (Creativity is much more than a skill, and service orientation is more of a disposition than a skill.) the flavor of this list is generally in sync with the kinds of skills, dispositions, and behaviors required in a complex and rapidly changing world.

The "skills" in this list cannot be…

  • developed in learning environments focused primarily on correctness or in workplace environments that don't allow for mistakes; or
  • measured with ratings on surveys or on tests of people's ability to provide correct answers.

These "skills" are best developed through cycles of goal setting, information gathering, application, and reflection—what we call virtuous cycles of learning—or VCoLs. And they're best assessed with tests that focus on applications of skill in real-world contexts, like Lectical Assessments, which are based on a rich research tradition focused on the development of understanding and skill.

 

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Learning and metacognition

Metacognition is thinking about thinking. Metacognitive skills are an interrelated set of competencies for learning and thinking, and include many of the skills required for active learning, critical thinking, reflective judgment, problem solving, and decision-making. People whose metacognitive skills are well developed are better problem-solvers, decision makers and critical thinkers, are more able and more motivated to learn, and are more likely to be able to regulate their emotions (even in difficult situations), handle complexity, and cope with conflict. Although metacognitive skills, once they are well-learned, can become habits of mind that are applied unconsciously in a wide variety of contexts, it is important for even the most advanced learners to “flex their cognitive muscles” by consciously applying appropriate metacognitive skills to new knowledge and in new situations.

Lectica's learning model, VCoL+7 (the virtuous cycle of learning and +7 skills) leverages metacognitive skills in a number of ways. For example, the fourth step in VCoL is reflection & analysis, the +7 skills include reflective dispositionself-monitoring and awareness, and awareness of cognitive and behavioral biases.

Learn more

 

Learning in the workplace occurs optimally when the learner has a reflective disposition and receives both insitutional and educational support

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