The dark? side of Lectical Assessment

Recently, members of our team at Lectica have been discussing potential misuses of Lectical Assessments, and exploring the possibility that they could harm some students. There are serious concerns that require careful consideration and discussion, and I urge readers to pitch in.

One of the potential problems we've discussed is the possiblilty that students will compare their scores with one another, and that students with lower scores will suffer from these comparisons. Here's my current take on this issue.

Students receive scores all the time. By third grade they already know their position in the class hierarchy, and live everyday with that reality. Moreover, despite the popular notion that all students can become above average if they work hard enough, average students don't often become above average students, which means that during their entire 12 years of schooling, they rarely receive top rewards (the best grades) for the hard work they do. In fact, they often feel like they're being punished even when they try their best. To make things worse, in our current system they're further punished by being forced to memorize content they haven't been prepared to understand, a problem that worsens year by year.

Lectica's approach to assessment can't prevent students from figuring out where their scores land in the class distribution, but we can give all students an opportunity to see themselves as successful learners, no matter where their scores are in that distribution. Average or below average students may still have to live with the reality that they grow at different rates than some of their peers, but they'll be rewarded for their efforts, just the same.

I've been told by some very good teachers that it is unacceptable to use the expression "average student." While I share the instinct to protect students from the harm that can come from labels, I don't share the belief that being an average student is a bad thing. Most of us were average students—or to be more precise, 68% of us were within one standard deviation of the mean. How did being a member of the majority become a bad thing?  And what harm are we doing to students by creating the illusion that we are all capable of performing above the mean?

I don't think we hurt children by serving up reality. We hurt them when we mislead them by telling them they can all be above average, or when we make them feel hopeless by insisting that they all learn at the same pace, then punishing them when they can't keep up.

I'm not saying it's not possible to raise the average. We do it by meeting the specific learning needs of every student and making sure that learning time is spent learning robustly. But we can't change the fact that there's a distribution. And we shouldn't pretend this is the case.

Lectical Assessments are tests, and are subject to the same abuses as other tests. But they have three attributes that help mitigate these abuses. First, they allow all students without severe disabilities to see themselves as learners. Second, they help teachers customize instruction to meet the needs of each student, so more kids have a chance to achieve their full potential. And finally, they reward good pedagogy—even in cases in which the assessments are being misused. After all, testing drives instruction.

One thought on “The dark? side of Lectical Assessment

  1. Hi Theo,

    I agree with you in this case. The sense of paternalistic protection that teachers, parents and the structure of the educational system itself exercise towards students can be harmful and disempowering whe misplaced, and I think it is widely mispaced. Especially when delievering ideological messages unfounded on reality (like promoting the fantasy that everyone can be above average, and sometimes that average is bad), it enlarges the gap between the microcosm that schools represent and the world at large which children cannot be "protected" from forever.

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