Straw men and flawed metrics

khan_constructivistTen years ago, Kirschner, Sweller, & Clark published an article entitled, Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: An analysis of the failure of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based teaching.

In this article, Kirschner and his colleagues contrast outcomes for what they call "guidance instruction" (lecture and demonstration) with those from constructivism-based instruction. They conclude that constructivist approaches produce inferior outcomes.

The article suffers from at least three serious flaws

First, the authors, in making their distinction between guided instruction and constructivist approaches, have created a caricature of constructivist approaches. Very few experienced practitioners of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experiential, or inquiry-based teaching would characterize their approach as minimally guided. "Differently guided" would be a more appropriate term. Moreover, most educators who use constructivist approaches include lecture and demonstration where these are appropriate.

Second, the research reviewed by the authors was fundamentally flawed. For the most part, the metrics employed to evaluate different styles of instruction were not reasonable measures of the kind of learning constructivist instruction aims to support—deep understanding (the ability to apply knowledge effectively in real-world contexts). They were measures of memory or attitude. Back in 2010, Stein, Fisher, and I argued that metrics can't produce valid results if they don't actually measure what we care about  (Redesigning testing: Operationalizing the new science of learning. Why isn't this a no-brainer?

And finally, the longitudinal studies Kirschner and his colleagues reviewed had short time-spans. None of them examined the long-term impacts of different forms of instruction on deep understanding or long-term development. This is a big problem for learning research—one that is often acknowledged, but rarely addressed.

Since Kirschner's article was published in 2006, we've had an opportunity to examine the difference between schools that provide different kids of instruction, using assessments that measure the depth and coherence of students' understanding. We've documented a 3 to 5 year advantage, by grade 12, for students who attend schools that emphasize constructivist methods vs. those that use more "guidance instruction". 

To learn more, see:

Are our children learning robustly?

Lectica rationale

 

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