President Trump on intelligence

How complex are the ideas about intelligence expressed in President Trump’s tweets?

President Trump recently tweeted about his intelligence. The media has already had quite a bit to say about these tweets. So, if you’re suffering from Trump tweet trauma this may not be the article for you.

But you might want to hang around if you’re interested in looking at these tweets from a different angle. I thought it would be interesting to examine their complexity level, and consider what they suggest about the President’s conception of intelligence.

In the National Leaders Study, we’ve been using CLAS — Lectica, Inc.’s electronic developmental scoring system—to score the complexity level of several national leaders’ responses to questions posed by respected journalists. Unfortunately, I can’t use CLAS to score tweets. They’re too short. Instead, I’m going to use the Lectical Dictionary to examine the complexity of ideas being expressed in them.


If you aren’t familiar with the National Leaders series, you may find this article a bit difficult to follow.


The Lectical Dictionary is a developmentally curated list of about 200,000 words or short phrases (terms) that represent particular meanings. (The dictionary does not include entries for people, places, or physical things.) Each term in the dictionary has been assigned to one of 30 developmental phases, based on its least complex possible meaning. The 30 developmental phases span first speech (in infancy) to the highest adult developmental phase Lectica has observed in human performance. Each phase represents 1/4 a level (a, b, c, or d). Levels range from 5 (first speech) to 12 (the most complex level Lectica measures). Phase scores are named as follows: 09d, 10a, 10b, 10c, 10d, 11a, etc. Levels 10 through 12 are considered to be “adult levels,” but the earliest phase of level 10 is often observed in middle school students, and the average high school student performs in the 10b to10c range.

In the following analysis, I’ll be identifying the highest-phase Lectical Dictionary terms in the President’s statements, showing each item’s phase. Where possible, I’ll also be looking at the form of thinking—black-and-white, if-then logic (10a–10d) versus shades-of-gray, nuanced logic (11a–11d)—these terms are embedded in.

The President’s statements

The first two statements are tweets made on 01–05–2018.

“…throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart.

The two most complex ideas in this statement are the notion of having personal assets (10c), and the notion of mental stability (10b).

“I went from VERY successful businessman, to top T.V. Star…to President of the United States (on my first try). I think that would qualify as not smart, but genius…and a very stable genius at that!”

This statement presents an argument for the President’s belief that he is not only smart, but a stable genius (10b-10c). The evidence offered consists of a list of accomplishments—being a successful (09c) businessman, being a top star, and being elected (09b) president. (Stable genius is not in the Lectical Dictionary, but it is a reference back to the previous notion of mental stability, which is in the dictionary at 10b.)

The kind of thinking demonstrated in this argument is simple if-then linear logic. “If I did these things, then I must be a stable genius.”

Later, at Camp David, when asked about these Tweeted comments, President Trump explained further…

“I had a situation where I was a very excellent student, came out, made billions and billions of dollars, became one of the top business people, went to television and for 10 years was a tremendous success, which you’ve probably heard.”

This argument provides more detail about the President’s accomplishments—being an excellent (08a) student, making billions and billions of dollars, becoming a top business person, and being a tremendous success (10b) in television. Here the president demonstrates the same if-then linear logic observed in the second tweet, above.

Summing up

The President has spoken about his intelligence on numerous occasions. Across all of the instances I’ve identified, he makes a strong connection between intelligence and concrete accomplishments — most often wealth, fame, or performance (for example in school or in negotiations). I could not find a single instance in which he attributed any part of these accomplishments to external or mitigating factors — for example, luck, being born into a wealthy family, having access to expert advice, or good employees. (I’d be very interested in seeing any examples readers can send my way!)

President Trump’s statements represent the same kind of logic and meaning-making my colleagues and I observed in the interview responses analysed for the National Leaders’ series. President Trump’s logic in these statements has a simple, if-then structure and the most complex ideas he expresses are in the 10b to10c range. As yet, I have seen no evidence of reasoning above this range.

The average score of a US adult is in the 10c–10d range.

 

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