If you want students to develop faster, stop trying to speed up learning

During the last 20 years—since high stakes testing began to take hold—public school curricula have undergone a massive transformation. Standards have pushed material that was once taught in high school down into the 3rd and 4th grade, and the amount of content teachers are expected to cover each year has increased steadily. The theory behind this trend appears to be that learning more content and learning it earlier will help students develop faster.

But is this true? Is there any evidence at all that learning more content and learning it earlier produces more rapid development? If so, I haven't seen it.

In fact, our evidence points to the opposite conclusion. Learning more and learning it earlier may actually be interfering with the development of critical life skills—like those required for making good decisions in real-life contexts. As the graph below makes clear, students in schools that emphasize covering required content do not develop as rapidly as students in schools that focus on fostering deep understanding—even though learning for understanding generally takes more time than learning something well enough to "pass the test."

What is worse, we're finding that the average student in schools with the greatest emphasis on covering required content appears to stop developing by the end of grade 10, with an average score of 10.1. This is the same score received by the average 6th grader in schools with the greatest emphasis on fostering deep understanding.

The graphs in this post are based on data from 17,755 LRJA assessments. The LRJA asks test-takers to respond to a complex real-life dilemma. They are prompted to explore questions about:

  • finding, creating, and evaluating information and evidence,
  • perspectives, persuasion, and conflict resolution,
  • when and if it's possible to be certain, and
  • the nature of facts, truth, and reality.

Students were in grades 4-12, and attended one or more of 56 schools in the United States and Canada.

The graphs shown above represent two groups of schools—those with students who received the highest scores on the LRJA and those with students who received the lowest scores. These schools differed from one another in two other ways. First, the highest performing schools were all private schools*. Most students in these schools came from upper middle SES (socio-economic status) homes. The lowest performing schools were all public schools primarily serving low SES inner city students.

The second way in which these schools differed was in the design of their curricula. The highest performing schools featured integrated curricula with a great deal of practice-based learning and a heavy emphasis on fostering understanding and real-world competence. All of the lowest performing schools featured standards-focused curricula with a strong emphasis on learning the facts, formulas, procedures, vocabulary, and rules targeted by state tests.

Based on the results of conventional standardized tests, we expected most of the differences between student performances on the LRJA in these two groups of schools to be explained by SES. But this was not the case. Private schools with more conventional curricula and high performing public schools serving middle and upper middle SES families did indeed outperform the low SES schools, but as shown in the graph below, by grade 12, their students were still about 2.5 years behind students in the highest performing schools. At best, SES explains only about 1/2 of the difference between the best and worst schools in our database. (For more on this, see the post, "Does a focus on deep understanding accelerate growth?")

By the way, the conventional standardized test scores of students in this middle group, despite their greater emphasis on covering content, were no better than the conventional standardized test scores of students in the high performing group. Focusing on deep understanding appears to help students develop faster without interfering with their ability to learn required content.

This will not be our last word on the subject. As we scale our K-12 assessments, we'll be able to paint an increasingly clear picture of the developmental impact of a variety of curricula.


Lectica's nonprofit mission is to help educators foster deep understanding and lifelong growth. We can do it with your help! Please donate now. Your donation will help us deliver our learning tools—free—to K-12 teachers everywhere.


*None of these schools pre-selected their students based on test scores. 

See a version of this article on Medium.

Learning and metacognition

Metacognition is thinking about thinking. Metacognitive skills are an interrelated set of competencies for learning and thinking, and include many of the skills required for active learning, critical thinking, reflective judgment, problem solving, and decision-making. People whose metacognitive skills are well developed are better problem-solvers, decision makers and critical thinkers, are more able and more motivated to learn, and are more likely to be able to regulate their emotions (even in difficult situations), handle complexity, and cope with conflict. Although metacognitive skills, once they are well-learned, can become habits of mind that are applied unconsciously in a wide variety of contexts, it is important for even the most advanced learners to “flex their cognitive muscles” by consciously applying appropriate metacognitive skills to new knowledge and in new situations.

Lectica's learning model, VCoL+7 (the virtuous cycle of learning and +7 skills) leverages metacognitive skills in a number of ways. For example, the fourth step in VCoL is reflection & analysis, the +7 skills include reflective dispositionself-monitoring and awareness, and awareness of cognitive and behavioral biases.

Learn more

 

Learning in the workplace occurs optimally when the learner has a reflective disposition and receives both insitutional and educational support

Why we need to LEARN to think

I'm not sure I buy the argument that reason developed to support social relationships, but the body of research described in this New Yorker article clearly exposes several built-in biases that get in the way of high quality reasoning. These biases are the reason why learning to think should be a much higher priority in our schools (and in the workplace). 

How to teach critical thinking: make it a regular practice

We've argued for years that you can't really learn critical thinking by taking a critical thinking course. Critical thinking is a skill that develops through reflective practice (VCoL). Recently, a group of Stanford scientists reported that a reflective practice approach not only works in the short term, but it produces "sticky" results. Students who are routinely prompted to evaluate data get better at evaluating data—and keep evaluating it even after the prompts are removed. 

Lectica is the only test developer that creates assessments that measure and support this kind of learning.

Correctness, argumentation, and Lectical Level

How correctness, argumentation, and Lectical Level work together diagnostically

In a fully developed Lectical Assessment, we include separate measures of aspects of arguments such as mechanics (spelling, punctuation, and capitalization), coherence (logic and relevance), and persuasiveness (use of evidence, argument, & psychology to persuade). (We do not evaluate correctness, primarily because most existing assessments already concern themselves primarily with correctness.) When educators use Lectical Assessments, they use information about Lectical Level, mechanics, coherence, persuasiveness, and sometimes correctness to diagnose students' learning needs. Here are some examples:

Level of skill (low, average, high) relative to expectations

  Lectical Level Mechanics Coherence Persuasiveness Correctness
Case 1 high high low average high
Case 2 high high high low low
Case 3 low average low low high

Case 1

This student has relatively high Lectical, mechanics, and correctness scores, but their performance is low in coherence and the persuasiveness of their answers is average. Because lower coherence and persuasiveness scores suggest that a student has not yet fully integrated their new knowledge, this student is likely to benefit most from participating in activities that require them to apply their existing knowledge in relevant contexts (using VCoL).

Case 2

This student's scores, with the exception of their correctness score, are high relative to expectations. This students' knowledge appears to be well integrated, but the combination of average persuasiveness and low correctness suggests that there are gaps in their content knowledge relative to targeted content. Here, we would suggest filling in the missing content knowledge in a way that integrates it into this students' well-developed knowledge network.

Case 3

The scores received by this student are high for correctness, while they are average for mechanics, and low for Lectical Level, coherence, and persuasiveness. This pattern suggests that the student is memorizing content without integrating it effectively into his or her knowledge network and has been doing this for some time. This student is most likely to benefit from applying their existing content knowledge in personally relevant contexts (using VCoL) until their coherence, persuasiveness, and Lectical scores catch up with their correctness scores.

Interpreting CLAS Demo reports

What the CLAS demo measures

The CLAS demo assessment (the LRJA) is a measure of the developmental level of people's reasoning about knowledge, evidence, deliberation, and conflict. People who score higher on this scale are able to work effectively with increasingly complex information and solve increasingly complex problems. 

CLAS is the name of our scoring system—the Computerized Lectical Assessment System. It measures the developmental level (hierarchical complexity) of responses on a scale called the Lectical Scale (also called the skill scale). 

It does not measure:

  • your use of particular vocabulary
  • writing mechanics (spelling, punctuation, capitalization)
  • coherence (quality of logic or argument)
  • relevance
  • correctness (measured by most standardized tests) 

These dimensions of performance are related to Lectical Level, but they are not the same thing. 

The reliability of the CLAS score

The Lectical Scores on CLAS demo assessments are awarded with our electronic scoring system, CLAS.

  • CLAS scores agree with human scores within 1/5 of a level about 90% of the time. That's the same level of agreement we expect between human raters. This level of agreement is more than acceptable for formative classroom use and program evaluation. It is not good enough for making high stakes decisions.
  • We don't recommend making high stakes decisions based on the results of any one assessment. Performance over time (growth trajectory) is much more reliable than an individual score.
  • CLAS is not as well calibrated above 11.5 as it is at lower levels. This is because there are fewer people in our database who perform at the highest levels. As our database grows, CLAS will get better at scoring those performances.

Benchmarks

You can find benchmarks for childhood and adulthood in our article, Lectical levels, roles, and educational level.

The figure below shows growth curves for four different kinds of K-12 schools in our database. If you want to see how an individual student's growth relates to this graph, we suggest taking at least three assessments over the course of a year or more. (The top performing school "Rainbow," is the Rainbow Community School, in North Carolina.)

 

Lectica basics for schools

If you are a school leader, this post is for you. Here, you'll find information about Lectica, it's mission, and our first electronically scored Lectical Assessment—the LRJA.

Background

Lectica, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable corporation. It's mission is to build and deliver learning tools that help students build skills for thinking and learning. These learning tools are backed by a strong learning model—the Virtuous Cycle of Learning (VCoL+7™)—and a comprehensive vision for educational testing and learning, which you can learn more about in our white paper—Virtuous cycles of learning: Redesigning testing during the digital revolution

We have spent over 20 years developing our methods and the technology required to deliver our learning tools—known as Lectical™ Assessments or DiscoTests®—at scale. These assessments are backed by a large body of research, including ongoing investigations of their validity and reliability. Here are some links to research reports:

The following video provides an overview our research and mission:

Current offerings

In the fall of 2016, we introduced our first electronically scored Lectical Assessment—the LRJA (an assessment of reflective judgment/critical thinking). The LRJA can be used in research and program evaluation as a summative assessment, or in the classroom as a formative assessment—or both.

The best way to learn about the LRJA is to experience it first-hand at lecticalive. Just click on this link, then select the "go straight to the demo" button. On the next page, fill in the sign up form with the educational level of your choice. Click "submit", then, click on the "autofill" button (top right, under the header) to fill the responses form with an example. 

If you're interested in working with the LRJA or would like to learn more about using Lectical Assessments to optimize thinking and learning, please contact us.

Robust knowledge knowledge networks catalyze development

Lectica's learning model, VCoL+7, emphasizes the importance of giving students ample opportunity to build well-connected knowledge networks through application and reflection. We argue that evidence of the level of integration in students' knowledge networks can be seen in the quality of their argumentation. In other words, we think of poor arguments as a symptom of poor integration. In the research reported in the video below, we asked if students' ability to make good arguments predicts their rate of growth on the Lectical Scale. 

Second language learning predicts the growth of critical thinking

On November 20th, 2016, we presented a paper at the ACTFL conference in Boston. In this paper, we described the results of a 4-year research project, designed to address the question, "Does second language learning support the development of critical thinking as measured by the LRJA?". To learn more, view the presentation below.