Support from neuroscience for robust, embodied learning

Human connector, by jgmarcelino from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, via Wikimedia Commons

Fluid intelligence Connectome

For many years, we've been arguing that learning is best viewed as a process of creating networks of connections. We've defined robust learning as a process of building knowledge networks that are so well connected they allow us to put knowledge to work in a wide range of contexts. And we've described embodied learninga way of learning that involves the whole person and is much more than the memorization of facts, terms, definitions, rules, or procedures.

New evidence from the neurosciences provides support for this way of thinking about learning. According to research recently published in Nature, people with more connected brains—specifically those with more connections across different parts of the brain—demonstrate greater intelligence than those with less connected brains—including better problem-solving skills. And this is only one of several research projects that report similar findings.

Lectica exists because we believe that if we really want to support robust, embodied learning, we need to measure it. Our assessments are the only standardized assessments that have been deliberately developed to measure and support this kind of learning.